Provocation again: Russia accuses Ukraine, Poland of altering history

14:45 Nov. 30, 2016

Russia accuses Ukraine, Poland of altering history

A driver dressed in Red Army World War II uniform cleans his World War II tank before a historical parade in Red Square (AP photo)

The Ukraine-Poland joint declaration is an aggressive step

The Russian State Duma accuses Poland and Ukraine of russophobia and provocations against Russia.

In a statement published by the Russian parliament on Wednesday, the country's lawmakers say that Poland and Ukraine are demonstrating a desire to ally themselves against Russia, and thus endangering relation with Moscow and disrupting the integrity of their own borders. 

Read also Russia shouts 'provocation'

On October 20, the parliaments of Poland and Ukraine approved a joint Declaration of solidarity and memory, declaiming against Russia's aggressive policies in the present and in the past, including signing the Molotov-Ribbentrop pact of 1939, that led to WWII outbreak and occupation of Poland by Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union. 

The Russian parliament says Poland and Ukraine are trying to "rewrite history and revise the beginning of the WWII and its outcome". Russia will never let the postwar political order in Europe to be altered, the statement claims. 

Read also WWII relics found in Lviv

Also, it announced the Ukrainian-Polish declaration unlawful and aiming to revise the decisions of the Nurnberg Trials.

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